Lucas Lefèvre
From France
5 years  in Hamburg
Teamlead at JIMDO


Hi Lucas! What a lovely heart-shaped stain on your shirt. Talking about hearts – tell us about your journey to Hamburg!
Thank you! As you see, it is the loveliest stain ever. I’m smiling but it was burning like hell! I decided to move to Hamburg to follow the woman I love. She grew up in Hamburg and I grew up in a small town the north of France. I immediately fell in love with this city for many reasons. The streets, the international vibes, the nightlife, the architecture, the diversity of faces you can meet in the street and of course my wife’s family. As a Frenchy, I needed to adapt to the German culture. You can say whatever you want – we are geographically so close, but so different culturally. No, I don’t like to be naked at the sauna. No, I don’t like to wear a flashy red winter jacket for which I paid 500 euros, just because “it is super comfi”! And yes, I wish to have a super tasty dessert at the restaurant. I find it crazy that German restaurants neglect the dessert part so much!

Why do you think it’s important to have differences of opinion? Isn’t it quite tiring to always argue? Or does it bring people further?
Well, you can have an healthy conversation without agreeing with someone. I often disagree but rarely argue. Sometimes, I feel like people only think about pleasing each other and hide their true opinion on things. Looking for consensus leads to inactivity, which leads to inaction – which we know can be devastating for a society. I love the feeling when I manage to make people doubt a strong opinion they have. You can also notice that many people have strong opinions on things that they have no experience with … This is incredibly sad. But I already go too far, no?

Sarcasm: what have your experiences been like in Hamburg?
80 per cent of my jokes or puns are unsuccessful in Germany. This is a pure drama and one of the reasons I love to regularly come back to France. Making a joke or a sarcastic sentence really fast in the flow of a conversation is so satisfying. Even if my German is good, this is still one step that I have to reach to become fluent. Anyway, I still manage to make people laugh when I try to pronounce “squirrel” in German … That’s a good start! I have so many funny stories to tell about words I didn’t understand right in German that I need my own double page in Gute Leute!

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